VII. CONSEQUENCES - John Wawrzonek

Consequences at 1.0°C

Heat stroke is a horrable way to die.

Most of us have not experienced the intensity of weather under climate change. In the first imnage below, in Pakistan, normally high temperatures are made higher to the point that it is impossible to stay in a building without air conditioning. Yet air conditioning is essentially impossible without nuclear power. There is not enough power to operate air conditioner and building more fossel fuel power plants adds to the carbon dioxide. In 2017 when this photograph was made the temperature of the earth had increased about 1°C. By the end of the century temperaturers of 3°C or higher are possible. In the meantime oil companies would like to sell as much of their reserves as possible.

The consequence of exposure to high temperatures is heatstroke. If you think we have trouble now, wait a bit until the planet gets to 2°C.

Here is a note from the Mayo Clinic:

Heatstroke is a condition caused by your body overheating, usually as a result of prolonged exposure to or physical exertion in high temperatures. This most serious form of heat injury, heatstroke, can occur if your body temperature rises to 104 F (40 C) or higher. The condition is most common in the summer months. Heatstroke requires emergency treatment. Untreated heatstroke can quickly damage your brain, heart, kidneys and muscles. The damage worsens the longer treatment is delayed, increasing your risk of serious complications or death.

A warmer future is projected to lead to increases in future mortality on the order of thousands to tens of thousands of additional premature deaths per year across the United States by the end of this century.

In this June 4, 2017, photograph, Pakistani people bathe in a canal to beat the heat and get some relief from the extremely hot weather during the eighth day of Ramadan. Maximum temperatures of 116.6 degrees Fahrenheit (47 degrees Celsius) have been recorded in Lahore, Pakistan. PHOTOGRAPH BY RANA SAJID HUSSAIN, PACIFIC PRESS, LIGHTROCKET, GETTY IMAGES via National Geographic

Hurricane Harvey: Desolation and Despair. Congress is still arguing about an aid bill.

Powered by SmugMug Log In